If you’re thinking about changing careers, consider this: 87 percent of those who change careers say they are happy with this change, and 65 percent say they have less stress, according to the American Institute of Economic Research.

And while it always makes sense to exploit your existing skills, if you crave a fresh start, there are many jobs that do not require more formal education (although some may require certification courses or on-the-job training). These 20 great second careers do not require opening many books. Salary figures come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Real Estate Agent

REAL ESTATE AGENT
Average annual salary: $ 59,360
You will not need more formal education to help others buy and sell their homes, but in most states, you need to take a pre-licensing course and a licensing exam to get you started, according to Realtor.com. When you make it official, joining an agency that looks for new agents is an essential step, but take note: You’ll probably receive a commission-only payment, so you go out and sell, sell, and sell.

SCHOOL BUS DRIVER
Average annual salary: $ 31,110
You like children? Would you like to have a summer vacation? Many districts are constantly looking for reliable drivers. The first step will be to get a commercial driver’s license with a special school bus backup, a process that requires you to pass a written test, road test and medical examination, according to DMV.org. Having a good driving record is also a must. School districts will also request a background check.

TECHNICAL LIBRARIAN
Average annual salary: $ 34,780
A good library technician is essentially the right hand of the librarian: It will help employers find materials, catalogs, retrieve online reference information, and perform other tasks as assigned, according to the American Library Association. Although some libraries are looking for specialists, many are open to on-the-job training, according to ALA.

INSURANCE AGENT
Average Annual Salary: $ 67,760
You do not need any special diploma to sell insurance, but you will have to check the specific requirements of your state. As with real estate, you will need to pass a training course and licensing exam. After that, job seekers will have to use their entrepreneurial spirit to engage their first job with an insurer, as advised by Investopedia. One more thing: Maybe you work for commission and not for a guaranteed salary.

PERSONAL TRAINER
Average Annual Salary: $ 42,780
If you are passionate about fitness, being a personal trainer can be an ideal second career. To begin, you must obtain certification through an accredited program: some known options include the American Council of Exercises and the National Academy of Sports Medicine, according to VeryWell. Next, you have to decide whether you want to work in a gym or a studio, or if you will build your own customer base on your own.

POSTMAN
Average annual salary: $ 50,610
You do not need to go to any school, beyond high school diploma, to become a postman of the United States Postal Service. What you need is: A safe driving record, as well as a background check, drug screenings and doctors. Selected candidates must take an aptitude test to identify if you have the skills needed for the job.

FLORAL DESIGNER
Average annual salary: $ 27,610
Do you have an eye for color and textures? Do you like fresh flowers? Floral designers who craft ingenious bouquets and other arrangements often learn through experience, according to The Art Career Project. However, completing a certificate program or a degree in floral design can help you move forward faster, especially if you want to open your own business.

HEALTH CARE AT HOME
Average Annual Salary: $ 23,600 If you love helping people with special medical needs but do not want to study in nursing school or take similar specialized training, consider becoming a home health aide. You will work with older people, the disabled and others who need help in their daily lives. Training usually takes place on the job, but you will also need state certification to work with agencies that take Medicare and Medicaid, according to Learn.org.

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