With the increase of electric cars in the world, the automotive works in infrastructure to charge batteries in just 15 minutes.

Bmw Wants To Create A More Powerful Supercarger Than TeslaThe 2 million electric cars currently circulating on the planet are just the beginning of an automotive revolution in which BMW wants to take the global lead, not only with vehicles, but with infrastructure.

According to estimates by the German firm, in 2025, 25% of the world’s vehicles will operate with electric batteries, so the priority now is to create an infrastructure that provides power to these cars.

“In the next 3 to 4 years we will see a substantial increase in the capacity of the batteries, so we need a new infrastructure,” says Dirk Arnold, BMW’s vice president of electric mobility at the global level during his participation in the Sustainability Mobility Forum urban and electric, organized by BMW and Siemens.

Arnold announced the creation of a supercharger of high power of 350 kw, that could load a big battery in 15 minutes. Tesla superchargers have 120 kw and take 45 minutes to recharge a battery.

This charger is working in partnership with other brands such as Ford and Volkswagen, to start operating at 450 points in Europe in the coming years and then extend to North America.

In Mexico they work in partnership with Nissan to place electric chargers in public spaces, although none has the power of a supercharger.

Arnold says the reason for moving the automotive world in this direction is to reduce carbon emissions.

“Technology is important to create these vehicles, but the main driver is climate change, although there are neighbors who prefer not to believe in science,” Arnold said.

As for the energy source of the superchargers, it is ideal that they feed on a mixture of electric energy and solar energy.

And the batteries? The brand is responsible for collecting batteries every 15 years, take them to a ‘farm’ where they are given new life, taking them to 30 years. After that they are planned to be taken to specialized recycling plants.

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