Ron Klain to Step Down as Biden’s Chief of Staff in White House: NPR

Biden's chief of staff Ron Klain is getting ready to leave the White House : NPR

Klain’s departure is expected to come shortly after Biden delivers his State of the Union address on Feb. 7. It’s not clear who Biden will choose to take over for his longtime adviser, but the White House is bracing for a series of congressional investigations from Republicans who now control the House of Representatives. Also looming is the special counsel probe into Obama-era classified documents found in Biden’s personal files. Ron Klain is preparing to leave the White House after two years of significant legislative wins, but ahead of two years of looming investigations from Congress and a special counsel. The New York Times and other media outlets reported Klain’s impending departure just hours before the extraordinary revelation that the Department of Justice had spent more than 12 hours going through Biden’s personal belongings in his Wilmington, Del. home, finding more classified documents. It’s not clear who Biden will choose to take over for his longtime adviser Klain, who is expected to hand over the reins sometime after the State of the Union address, slated for Feb. 7. Klain has been a powerful, behind-the-scenes manager who helped protect and promote the president’s agenda, working closely with lawmakers to get sweeping spending bills for COVID aid, infrastructure, semiconductor manufacturing and climate incentives through Congress — and helped Democrats defy the odds and maintain control of the Senate in the midterm elections. Chris Whipple, who has studied White House chiefs of staff, said Klain stands out as one of the most successful in recent history. “White House chiefs usually get all of the blame and none of the credit for things that presidents do. That just goes with the job,” said Whipple, who spoke with Klain extensively for his new book. “Ron deserves a lot of credit for what has happened.” One of those moments came ahead of the 2021 midterm elections, when Klain and Biden’s political team convinced the president to focus on a narrow list of states and two main issues. Klain felt vindicated by the election results, Whipple said, describing an email he received from the chief of staff at 1:16 a.m. after it was clear Democrats did far better than expected. “Maybe we don’t suck as much as people thought,” Klain said in that email. In October 2021, a low point in Biden’s presidency, Klain wanted to quit, Whipple said. But Klain’s wife Monica Medina — a high-ranking State Department official — convinced him to stay on. Klain is widely respected in Democratic circles, but often reviled on the right, with some Republicans referring to him as “Prime Minister Klain”. Klain himself dismissed those accusations. He is known for rarely sleeping, but does not drink coffee — he prefers Diet Coke. And he tweets at all hours, describing Twitter as his “hobby”. Klain is seen as a stabilizing, traditional chief of staff after the four years and four chiefs of staff in the Donald Trump administration. He was also known to run a tight ship with limited leaks. Klain walks with Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin to see President Biden sign the Inflation Reduction Act into law on Aug. 16, 2022. His departure is expected to come shortly after Biden delivers his State of the Union address on Feb. 7. It’s not clear who Biden will choose to take over for his longtime adviser, but the White House is bracing for a series of congressional investigations from Republicans who now control the House of Representatives. Also looming is the special counsel probe into Obama-era classified documents found in Biden’s personal files.

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